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Angiosperms - Flowering plants

Angiosperms, flowering plants, also known as Angiospermae or Magnoliophyta, are the most diverse group of land plants. Angiosperms are seed-producing plants like the gymnosperms and can be distinguished from the gymnosperms by a series of synapomorphies (derived characteristics). These characteristics include flowers, endosperm within the seeds, and the production of fruits that contain the seeds.

The ancestors of flowering plants diverged from gymnosperms around 245–202 million years ago, and the first flowering plants known to exist are from 140 million years ago. They diversified enormously during the Lower Cretaceous and became widespread around 100 million years ago, but replaced conifers as the dominant trees only around 60-100 million years ago.

Source: Wikipedia

For Angiosperms in Zambia see website:  Flora of Zambia


To Read:

Woodland restoration
Go to the special item "Woodland restoration" to read the article on "Restoring natural vegetation" and the articles on "Orchids of Protea Hill Farm". Observations over 30 years.


Acacia Compromise
An attempt by Australian botanists to change the typification of Acacia from an African to an Australian species, which would mean that no African species would retain the name Acacia, caused outrage amongst African botanists. It seemed we were headed for a deadlock, reminiscent of the political impasses we have seen in Zimbabwe, Kenya and Ivory Coast. Who gets the name is to be decided at the 18th International Botanical Congress in Melbourne in July 2011. .....Read More



The Raffia Palm
The raffia palm (Raphia farinifera (Gaertn.) Hylander) is one of about 28 species of the genus Raphia, but is probably the best known, having a widespread distribution in tropical Africa and Madagascar.
It has the distinction of having the largest leaves in the plant kingdom, the record measuring 19.8m long, with the petiole 3.96m (D.J. Mabberley, The Plant-Book, 2nd Edition, Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997).
A wetland species, it occurs in peat dambos and on banks of perennial streams in frost-free zones. While it never stands in water, it grows on banks and elevated areas, with most of the root system in the water, but rooted into firm ground. The mature and juvenile palms can survive relatively light burns, and fire, or more likely smoke, stimulates the germination of the seeds.   .....Read More









Habenaria subarmata
Habenaria subarmata
Oeceoclades saundersiana
Oeceoclades saundersiana
Ceropegia purpurascens
Ceropegia purpurascens
Aloe duckeri
Aloe duckeri
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Updated: 14 April 2014
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