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Vegetation of Namwala district, Zambia
Forest Research Pamphlet No. 42 by D.B.Fanshawe

Digitized and edited by Mike Bingham, July 2015

Southern Province ‒ In 1997 Namwala District was subdivided, with the creation of the new district Itezhi-tezhi. In this map, downloaded from Wikipedia, the names are transposed; the larger part (green) is Itezhi-tezhi, the smaller Namwala. Itezhi-tezhi District, most of which lies within Kafue National Park, was moved from Southern to Central Province in 2012.

Southern Province, Zambia

Most of this series of reports are not dated, but assuming the numbering approximates the order in which they appeared the Namwala report was published in 1971 or ’72. The manuscripts were typed on wax stencils. While modern scanners reproduce the text accurately, the imperfections of the wax stencils cause many misreadings. The letters , ‘c’, ‘e’ and ‘o’, for example, often cannot be distinguished.
I have adapted the format of the species lists to be more appropriate as allowed by word processor technology. The appended Index lists all species names alphabetically with a second column to give currently accepted names. Names marked with an asterisk (*) are no longer valid, and the currently accepted names can be found on the index. The authenticity of the names can be checked on the websites African Plant Database, or Zambia Flora.

Click here to read or download the report.

Click
here to read or download the list of all plant species.
Click here to read or download the index list of all plant species.


The Chakwenga Headwaters and the Nyabutaye Peat Bog (December 2014).

Before Zambia went decimal the 80-mile milestone on the Great East Road marked a feature which nature enthusiasts coined the 80-Mile Dambo. A gorge cut into the hill range on the north side of the road drains into a peat bog which is the source of the Nyabutaye (Nyautai on the Survey Department maps), a short tributary of the Chakwenga, which has its source about 1 km to the west.

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The Steep-sided Termite Mounds of the Zambian Copperbelt (July 2014).

Steep-sided mounds are a feature of, but are not confined to the higher rainfall zone of the miombo biome. On most of the plateau the steep-sided mounds, when they occur, are aligned along the woodland margins, sometimes extending into the sandy dambos. On the flat or gently inclined interfluves the mounds are often degraded, sometimes to the point when they can be recognized only as circular patches of taller grass. Degradation is the result of the clay being leached away to be redeposited in the floodplains or dambo.

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Zambian species of Entandrophragma C.DC. (July 2014).

A genus of 11 species in tropical Africa. Most are emergents of evergreen or deciduous forests, typically with cylindrical boles unbranched to a considerable height. Leaves pinnate; leaflets opposite, entire. Flowers borne on panicles on the new growth. Stamens completely or partly fused to form a staminal tube. Fruit a large woody dehiscent capsule, the five valves separating in various ways to release the winged seeds. Three species in Zambia, including some of our tallest trees.

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Habenaria sochensis
In August the grass is dry,
ready to burn.
Satyrium carsonii
Entandrophragma caudatum
Eulophia cucullata
Eulophia cucullata
Disperis katangensis
Disperis katangensis
 Updated: 28 July 2015
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